Getting regular mole checks is essential for your overall health. They are your body’s first line of defense against cancer, so you should know what to look for. Benign moles should generally be the same size, shape, and color. You should also be able to see a mirror image on each side when you draw an imaginary line down the center. If there is a difference, it may be a sign of cancer.

Moles are a Sign of Skin Cancer

Moles are irregular growths on the skin. They vary in shape, size, and color. They can also have irregular borders. Occasionally, these growths may be itchy, burn, or itch. If these moles become more than a quarter inch in diameter, they could be a sign of skin cancer.

You can spot melanoma by looking for unusual changes in moles. Generally, moles are brown, black, or splotches of different colors. They are usually round or oval and are less than six millimeters in diameter. They typically appear during your childhood or early adulthood. If you notice any new moles have developed, see a doctor as soon as possible.

Moles are a sign of skin cancer and should be checked regularly by a dermatologist for a mole check Memphis TN. If they change color, height, or texture, this may be a symptom of melanoma. Having your moles checked regularly by a dermatologist will help you catch the disease early.

They Can be Cancerous

Getting a mole check is a great way to discover if you have skin cancer before it spreads. During the process, a plastic surgeon and skin specialist will examine the mole and the rest of your skin. If the doctor suspects cancer, they may perform a biopsy. This is done under a local anesthetic and is a way to determine whether cancer cells have spread to other parts of the body. If the biopsy shows cancerous cells, further tests will be needed.

The more moles a person has, the greater their risk of melanoma. Fortunately, most moles are harmless. However, the most common warning sign is the presence of a new mole. Another common warning sign is a spot that changes shape or color. This sign is known as an “ugly duckling” mole and may be a sign of melanoma.

Skin cancer is treatable, but it is essential to get it checked regularly. In addition, people with a family history of the disease should have their moles examined by a medical professional to ensure that they are not developing the disease. If a mole is found early, it can be removed to reduce cancer risk.

They Can be Removed

First, you should know the type of mole you have. There are a lot of home remedies and over-the-counter products available that can be used to remove a mole. You should also see your doctor if the mole is cancerous. While your primary care physician can remove a mole, a dermatologist is the best choice for removing more complex ones.

The procedure does require a local anesthetic, which will numb the area for a few minutes. Once the area is numb, your doctor will perform the function. Depending on the type of mole, the procedure may involve freezing, burning, or exciting. Typically, this will take no more than 10 minutes.

After mole removal, you can expect some soreness or itchiness. However, this should be minimal and will subside once the skin heals. Your doctor will instruct you on how to care for your wound afterward. It would help if you kept the treated area clean and moist after the procedure.

They Can be Treated

Moles are clumps of skin cells that appear anywhere on the body. They can vary in shape, size, and color. Some can be as large as a pencil eraser. They can also change color or become raised and flat. If you notice a mole that isn’t going away, it’s time to get it checked out.

Moles can be benign or cancerous. Most aren’t, but you should see your dermatologist if you notice changes in your skin. Sometimes moles can develop into more dangerous types, including melanoma. However, by getting a mole check, you can take preventive measures to keep your skin free of moles.

You should check your moles at least once a month to ensure nothing is growing or changing. It’s also important to take photos of your moles so that you can track any changes in them.